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San Diego’s granny flat ‘handbook’ aims to eliminate confusion, encourage construction

September 16, 2019
A granny flat in Clairemont.
(U-T File Photo)

The 42-page guide is part of city’s effort to solve housing affordability crisis

By DAVID GARRICK AUG. 15, 2019 

San Diego has created a 42-page granny flat handbook to encourage more property owners to construct such housing units by making the process easier to understand.

Granny flats, which are additional housing units on an existing property, are being viewed in San Diego and across the nation as a way to create more housing without more land or infrastructure.

City officials say granny flats are the fastest and cheapest way to grow the local supply of affordable housing, prompting them to create the handbook so fewer people will be intimidated or confused by the process.

The handbook explains zoning rules, parking requirements, the city’s approval process and the details of a subsidy program the city established last year.

It also covers how to secure a city permit, how far from property lines a granny flat must be built, how the units might affect property taxes, whether a unit can be sold and when the property owner must live on-site.

“These are the things people don’t think about when they decide to put one of these in,” said City Councilman Scott Sherman, who has spearheaded city legislation on granny flats.

The city collaborated on the handbook with the San Diego Housing Federation, the Local Initiatives Support Corporation, and the Pacific Southwest Association of Realtors. The city’s formal name for a granny flat is an accessory dwelling unit, or a companion unit.

“Companion units are an important tool that will create naturally occurring affordable housing units that are desperately needed in San Diego,” said Stephen Russell, Housing Federation executive director.

Ricardo Flores, executive director of LISC, said the handbook could be particularly helpful in low-income areas.

“The region’s housing crisis is a serious issue that hurts San Diego’s disadvantaged the most,” he said. “Companion Units will give residents in disinvested neighborhoods more options to improve housing affordability and better options to offset the cost of a mortgage.”

Sherman said the handbook will be followed by a companion guide this fall featuring a series of pre-approved design templates to reduce architecture costs and streamline the approval process.

“You pick up one of the pre-approved templates and you just build it and get it inspected and call it a day,” he said.

Encinitas recently began providing a similar set of templates to encourage construction of granny flats there.

Granny flats are considered ideal for recent college graduates, young people with lower-paying jobs and the senior citizens on fixed incomes who gave these units their colorful name.

In addition to boosting the local housing supply, granny flats generate income for homeowners that decrease the likelihood they will struggle to pay their mortgage.

A recent analysis of the city’s 236,000 single-family detached homes estimated that 2,700 to 5,500 granny flats could be built during the next decade.

The city’s efforts build on state legislation three years ago that eased parking regulations and rules requiring large buffer areas between structures and property lines.

San Diego has since eliminated sewer and water fees, shrunk development fees and loosened zoning regulations for granny flats.

Because some fees, such as those covering school construction, couldn’t be waived under state law, San Diego also established a subsidy program during the fiscal year that ended June 30.

The $300,000 set aside for the program was exhausted quickly and played a role in the construction of 84 granny flats across the city, so the City Council more than doubled funding to $800,000 for the fiscal year that began July 1.

Meanwhile, the city’s Housing Commission is launching a separate pilot program to build 40 granny flats adjacent to single-family homes on properties that the commission owns.

The new units, which could be constructed before the end of the year, will be geared for low-income tenants and include a variety of sizes and designs. The goal is analyzing costs, timelines, the construction process and potential hurdles.

The commission plans to use that information to launch a loan program next spring to help low-income households build granny flats on their properties.

Consider me your #1 resource for all things Real Estate! Household changing? Getting married (or divorced)? Time for a change of scenery or job relocation? Want to invest? Just send me an email or call 619-888-2117. I can help.

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The Dirty Secret About Most ‘Fixer Uppers’

September 12, 2019

Before you try to become your own dime-store Chip or Joanna Gaines, go back and check the math again on that “fixer upper.”

Then maybe check it a third time.

That’s the message of a new survey, which found that despite the glamor and plethora of TV programs devoted to home renovation, most amateur fixer-uppers end up being a big waste of time and money. Once you factor in all the costs involved, the renovation project often turned out no cheaper than just buying a home in move-in condition.

“Even though the majority of fixer-upper homeowners thought they could save money, they actually spent about the same or more than their move-in ready counterparts,” reported Porch.com, a home improvement website, which sponsored the survey.

Their survey of 1,069 U.S. homeowners found that those who had bought a home that was move-in ready spent an average of $250,000.

Those who bought a “fixer upper” spent an average of about $50,000 less. But then they typically spent that amount, or more, on the renovations, the survey found.

OK, so it may not be apples to apples. Buying your own home and renovating it gives you a greater chance to tailor it to your own dreams and needs. But the costs were comparable nonetheless. And those who just bought a home that was ready saved themselves a lot of extra pain.

The biggest problem with fixer uppers? The danger of running over budget.

More than two-fifths of those who bought fixer uppers ended up blowing way past their budget. On average they ended up spending about $76,000 on renovations, or 60% more than those who were able to stick to the allotted amount.

Among those who bust the budget, there was no common culprit either. For some it was the costs of repairing the roof. For others it was the costs of fixing the basement. New kitchens were about as likely to cause pain as new bathrooms. Ditto new flooring and new driveways, replacing the plumbing and replacing the electricals. Installing new heating, ventilation and air conditioning proved the most likely project to turn your wallet inside out, but not by a wide margin. You never know what’s going to turn your dream home into a “money pit” until it does.

About two-fifths of those who bust their budget said they wouldn’t buy their current home again.

Professional house restorers Chip and Joanna Gaines have become a cultural phenomenon thanks to their program, “Fixer Upper,” filmed in their hometown of Waco, Texas. The couple, who have five children, renovate old houses on behalf of home buyers moving to the city.

Regular fans of the program notice the pair always manage to bring the project home for the amount allotted, even when the projects are hit by sudden, unexpected problems. But the most recent survey suggest that’s what it’s like when you’re a professional — and on TV.

For more information, go to Porch.com

Consider me your #1 resource for all things Real Estate! Household changing? Getting married (or divorced)? Time for a change of scenery or job relocation? Want to invest? Just send me an email or call 619-888-2117. I can help.

As Recession Fears Rise, Here’s the Lowdown for Real Estate

September 5, 2019

It seems that whenever you pick up a newspaper or turn on the news these days, a scary word hits you in the face: “recession.” Germany is already teetering on the brink of recession; an unruly exit from the European Union this fall could cause one in Britain; and in the U.S., a rapidly escalating trade war with China is increasing fears.

But although the R-word may be a trigger for those who remember—or even experienced—the mass layoffs, scores of foreclosures, and plummeting home prices of the last downtown, folks shouldn’t panic just yet. And they shouldn’t expect another real estate fire sale.

“This is going to be a much shorter recession than the last one,” predicts George Ratiu, senior economist with realtor.com®. “I don’t think the next recession will be a repeat of 2008. … The housing market is in a better position.”

Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell indicated on Friday that last month’s interest rate cut would be followed by another in September, but cautioned that that might not be enough to counter the trade tensions, which ratcheted up in recent days as China responded to an earlier round of U.S. tariffs with its own, and President Donald Trump responded by making U.S. restrictions even tougher.

About 2% of economists, strategists, academics, and policymakers believe a recession will start this year, according to a recent survey of more than 200 members of the National Association for Business Economics. Thirty-eight percent believe one will begin in 2020, while 25% anticipate one starting in 2021. Fourteen percent expect it won’t materialize until after 2021.

However, Trump seems confident that there’s no risk of a recession at all. He’s been putting out a series of positive tweets about the economy for the past week or so.

He responded to China’s tariff announcement on Friday by tweeting, “Our Economy, because of our gains in the last 2 1/2 years, is MUCH larger than that of China. We will keep it that way!”

For sure, unemployment is hovering around the lowest it’s been in the past 50 years. (However, it turns out there weren’t as many jobs in 2018 and early 2019 as previously reported.) Wages are growing, and we’ve entered the longest economic expansion in U.S. history. But a downturn within the next two years still looks likely—particularly if a trade war heats up, making it more expensive to import goods. Those increased costs are likely to be passed along to everyday consumers.

The housing market’s risky mortgages and rampant speculation were blamed for plunging the world into a financial crisis the last time around. But these days real estate isn’t likely to be the cause of a recession.

Will home prices and sales plummet in a recession?

Aspiring buyers hoping that home prices will crash, like they did during the Great Recession, are likely in for a rude awakening. There simply aren’t enough homes being built to satisfy the hordes of buyers. And with more members of the giant millennial generation wanting single-family homes in which to raise their growing families, there isn’t likely to be a drop-off in demand anytime soon.

But the anticipation of a recession in itself could make the housing shortage even worse. Worried would-be sellers may decide to postpone listing until they can get top dollar for their properties.

Yet although a lack of homes for sale typically drives up prices, that effect could be mitigated if there are fewer folks who can afford to buy. In a recession, it could become harder to find a good-paying job or steady freelance work. Even those who remain gainfully employed may worry about their job stability.

“If we do go into a recession, there will be layoffs,” says Ali Wolf, director of economic research at Meyers Research, a national real estate consultancy. “If you move from a two-income household to a one-income household, it doesn’t change the desire to own. But it does impact the ability.”

Realtor.com’s Ratiu believes prices will flatten, but likely not fall. Meanwhile, the number of home sales will also remain flat or potentially even dip, he believes.

Other economists expect the recession to take a bigger toll on housing.

“With people having PTSD from the last time, they’re still afraid of buying at the wrong time,” Wolf says. “But prices aren’t likely to fall 50% like they did last time.

“We do expect prices will fall marginally,” she continues. The priciest parts of the country, which saw the biggest price hikes, could see the biggest price corrections. Sales could decline anywhere from 10% to 20%, she predicts.

The luxury market is already seeing price decreases. These high-end homes, usually in the range of $1 million and up, are usually considered a bellwether for the greater housing market.

A big wild card in all of this is mortgage interest rates, which were at an ultralow 3.55% for a 30-year, fixed-rate loan as of Thursday, according to Freddie Mac data. If they continue to fall, it could give the housing market a boost. That’s because low rates translate into lower monthly mortgage payments.

Could rentals become cheaper?

Those hoping for rental prices to be slashed will probably be disappointed as well.

“We expect a little bit of an impact,” says Greg Willett, chief economist at RealPage, a property management technology and analytics company for apartment buildings. “But it’s not doom and gloom.”

He expects apartment price hikes to slow from 3% annually to more minor 1.5% or 2% price increases over the next few years. The rental market is likely to be buffered by those nervous about making what could be the largest purchase of their lives, a home, in uncertain economic times. Those folks may decide to live in a rental until the economy is booming again.

By: Clare Trapasso via California Association of Realtors

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NAR: New Condo Rules Will Open More Doors for Buyers

August 22, 2019
Photo Courtesy: NAR

The association says changes to FHA financing qualifications will bring more entry-level homes to the market, helping to meet buyer demand.

REALTOR® Magazine Staff

The National Association of REALTORS®, after reviewing the Department of Housing and Urban Development’s new condominium financing rules, says the guidance affords property owners greater flexibility in the qualification process for loans insured by the Federal Housing Administration. Lenders will be able to issue FHA loans for single condo units, and buildings with a greater number of investor-owned units or greater percentage of commercial space can qualify for FHA financing, among other changes HUD released Wednesday. NAR expects the new rules, which will go into effect Oct. 15, to revive a condo market that has been stifled since the Great Recession.

NAR says the new condo rules, which will help more would-be buyers access affordable housing, satisfy many of the changes the association has backed for more than a decade. Specifically, the new rules will:

  • Extend FHA certifications on condo developments from two years to three years, with an additional six-month grace period to meet requirements. This will alleviate some of the cost and time burdens on condominium associations that intend to maintain FHA approval. Condo associations also may continue submitting updated recertification packages, rather than the full certification package each time. The National Association of REALTORS® expects the change to prompt more condominium properties to apply for FHA eligibility, making more affordable housing more accessible.
  • Allow for single-unit mortgage approvals—often known as spot approvals—that will enable FHA insurance of individual condo units, even if the entire property does not have FHA approval. The condo building in which the FHA buyer wants to purchase must meet certain requirements: The property must have at least five units, a limited concentration of FHA-insured units, at least 50% owner-occupancy, and a maximum of 35% commercial space.
  • Secure additional flexibility in the ratio of investors to owner-occupants allowed for FHA financing in a condo building. While the current owner-occupancy requirement is 50%, HUD may approve an owner-occupancy level as low as 35% for older properties with less than 10% of units in arrears. Individual investors can purchase no more than 10% of units in a property with more than 20 units and no more than one unit in properties with less than 20 units.

FHA approvals for condos prior to these changes have been heavily restricted. For example, the National Association of REALTORS® pointed to data earlier this year showing that in Florida’s Miami-Dade County, there were 5,683 condo projects—but only seven had FHA approval. NAR sent out an all-member email about the new condo rules Wednesday morning.

“It goes without saying that condominiums are often the most affordable option for first-time home buyers, small families, and those in urban areas,” NAR President John Smaby said in a statement. “This ruling, which culminates years of collaboration between HUD and NAR, will help reverse recent declines in condo sales and ensure the FHA is fulfilling its primary mission to the American people.”

The association’s most recent existing-home sales report, released in July, showed that sales of condos and co-ops dropped 6.5% year over year. Further, with more than 8.7 million condo units nationwide, only 17,792 FHA condo loans were originated in the past year. Down payments for single-family homes also have grown significantly more expensive in recent years in the absence of widely accessible FHA condo financing, NAR argues.

FHA restricted its condo approval process in 2009, which limited the number of properties that could receive FHA loans. In 2016, it moved to lift several of those restrictions, but the proposed rules were never finalized.

Consider me your #1 resource for all things Real Estate! Household changing? Getting married (or divorced)? Time for a change of scenery or job relocation? Want to invest? Just send me an email or call 619-888-2117. I can help.

A Seller’s Guide to Navigation the Home Inspection

August 15, 2019

Getting beyond the home inspection is sort of like advancing to the next level in a video game.

When you get past this step, you get to advance to a fresh, exciting place — your new home, to be exact.

In Every Inspection, There Are Stakes for Buyers and Sellers

Once the buyer has made, and you’ve accepted, the offer, your home will get the once-over from the buyer’s home inspector. The inspection is usually a contingency of the offer, meaning the buyer can back out based on serious problems discovered. The lender also expects an inspection to make sure it’s making a good investment. Makes sense, right? 

During the home inspection, an inspector will examine the property for flaws. Based on the inspector’s report the buyer will then give you a list of repair requests.

Your agent will work with you to negotiate those requests. Don’t want to be responsible for a repair? (Maybe it’s best if the buyer has the fix made by their own contractor anyway.) Your agent may be able to negotiate a price credit with the buyer instead. 

By the way, inspections aren’t necessarily a big, scary deal. Your agent will help advise you about repairs you need to make before the inspection. In fact, she may have made those recommendations to you even before you put the home on the market. And if you’ve been maintaining your home all along (and you have, right?), your punch list may be minimal.

In addition, back when you put the home on the market, you were required to disclose to buyers the home’s “material defects” — anything you know about the home that can either have a significant impact on the market value of the property or impair the safety of the house for occupants. Material defects tend to be big underlying problems, like foundation cracks, roof leaks, basement flooding, or termite infestation.

What a Home Inspection Covers Depends on the Home

Every home is different, so which items are checked during your property’s inspection may vary. But home inspectors typically look at the following areas during a basic inspection: 

  • Plumbing systems
  • Electrical systems
  • Kitchen appliances
  • Heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) equipment
  • Doors and windows
  • Attic insulation
  • Foundation and basement
  • Exterior (e.g., siding, paint, outdoor light fixtures) 
  • Grounds

Depending on the sales contract, the purchase may also be contingent on a roof inspection, radon inspection, or termite inspection.

What a home inspection won’t cover is the unseen. Your inspector isn’t going to rip open walls or mountaineer on the roof. (Though that would be kind of exciting to watch.)

So What Do You Need to Fix?

A home inspection report is by no means a to-do list of things that you must address. Many home repairs, including cosmetic issues and normal wear and tear, are negotiable. 

There are, however, three occasionally overlapping types of repairs that sellers are typically required to deal with after a home inspection:

1. Structural defects. This is any physical damage to the load-bearing elements of a home; these issues include a crack in the foundation, roof framing damage, and decaying floor boards.
2. Safety issues. Homes for sale have to meet certain safety standards. Depending on where you live, safety issues that you, the seller, may have to address could include mold problems, wildlife infestation, or exposed electrical wiring.
3. Building code violations. Building code violations — such as the absence of smoke detectors, use of non-flame retardant roofing material, and use of lead paint after 1978 — must be addressed by the seller.

Again, addressing these might take the form of a credit on the pirce, which in the case of structural issues could be sizeable.

Use This Checklist to Prepare for a Home Inspection

So, are you ready for the inspection? If you take these steps (with your agent’s assistance) you will be: 

  • Assemble your paperwork. Transparency is key. Ideally, you’ll have summaries or invoices of renovations, maintenance, and repairs you’ve done on your home that you can provide to the home buyer. Create a file that collects this documentation and share it with the buyer.
  • Make sure your home is squeaky clean. Your home should be pristine when the inspector arrives — a good first impression will set a positive tone. Take time to declutter and deep clean the whole house. A deep clean (stuff like cleaning the range hood and upholstery and sanitizing garbage cans), averages between $200 and $400, according to Angie’s List, depending on the size and condition of your home. 
  • Remove any obstacles that may block the inspector’s access.Take measures to ensure the inspector has complete access to all facets of the property, including electrical panels, attic space, and fireplaces. This may require temporarily moving clothing and other items that impede access.
  • Leave the utilities on. For the home inspector to test items such as the stove, dishwasher, furnace, and air conditioning system, the utilities must be connected regardless of whether the house is vacant; otherwise, the inspector may need to reschedule, which can potentially push back closing.
  • Fix minor problems ahead of time. Many cosmetic issues — say, a broken light fixture or a scratch on the wall — are minor and easy to fix, but they can make buyers more concerned about how well you’ve maintained other areas of the home. It’s best to take care of small problems yourself before the buyer’s inspection.

It’s a Good Idea to Do Your Own Inspection Before the Inspection

Some sellers choose to hire their own home inspector to check the property before their house is even listed. This is called a “pre-listing inspection,” and it has several advantages: 

  • It can give you time to fix deal breakers. Granted, a pre-inspection costs money — a basic inspection is about $315, with condos and homes under 1,000 sq ft. costing as little as $200 and homes over 2,000 sq ft. running $400 or more, according to HomeAdvisor.com. That said, it can enable you to address major issues that could cause a buyer to pull out of their offer. Big problems may include mold, water damage, or foundation cracks. 
  • It can mean fewer surprises — and help you market your home. Knowing what needs to be fixed in your home in advance will enable you to be upfront with buyers about any big pre-existing issues, which can give buyers peace of mind. You can also make it known to prospective buyers that consideration for those items has already been factored into the sales price.
  • It can speed up the negotiation process. Having a pre-listing inspection can help reduce, or even eliminate the time-consuming process of having back-and-forth negotiations.

If you discover any material defects to the property in a pre-listing inspection, you are legally required to disclose them to buyers — even if you fix them. Also there’s no guarantee that the buyer’s own inspection won’t reveal things yours didn’t find. The choice to do a pre-listing inspection is yours, but it never hurts to get a head start on repairs.

Be Aware of These Tried-and-True Tactics for Negotiating Repairs

When it comes to repairs, your agent will haggle with the buyer’s agent for you — though it’s ultimately your decision as to how you want to respond to the buyer’s home repair requests.

Here are four time-tested negotiating techniques that your agent may deploy to protect your best interests — without reducing the sales price:

1. Agree to make reasonable repairs. Unless your house is flawless — and the reality is that no one’s is — be prepared to receive repair requests from the buyer. You don’t have to offer to fix everything that buyer asks of you, but you should take responsibility for major issues.
2. Offer a closing cost credit. Don’t want to deal with the hassle of making or ordering home repairs yourself? Ask your agent to offer the buyer a credit at closing for the estimated costs. This can also help you avoid complaints from the buyer over the quality of the workmanship, since you won’t be the one overseeing the repairs.
3. Barter. One way to smooth things over with a buyer and keep the deal moving forward is to offer something of value that’s unrelated to the requested repairs. For example, if you know the buyer loves the new couch or bedroom set you bought, you could offer to leave it behind in exchange for making fewer repairs.
4. Leverage the market. You may have more negotiating power depending on where you live. In a hot seller’s market, for instance, you might be in the position to offer the buyer fewer repairs, especially if you have another buyer eager to make an offer.

Home inspection may sound like a burdensome process, especially when you’re so close to your goal. But when you cross it off your list, you’re readier than ever to jump to the next level — and into your life’s newest phase.

Consider me your #1 resource for all things Real Estate! Household changing? Getting married (or divorced)? Time for a change of scenery or job relocation? Want to invest? Just send me an email or call 619-888-2117. I can help.

Should I Buy A Condo? The Pros and Cons

August 8, 2019

If you’re a potential buyer in the real estate market, you may wonder, “Should I buy a condo?” Condominiums are generally less costly to purchase than houses or townhouses, and they can offer conveniences you might not otherwise be able to afford. In fact, some buyers who are priced out of single-family homes in high-priced markets may qualify only for mortgage loans on condos or co-ops.

Condominiums can be a good investment, especially if they allow you as a buyer to enter the real estate market. Qualifying for financing is much the same as getting a mortgage for a single-family home. If you are purchasing condos as investment properties, you should be able to find a lender as well.

Yet there are caveats to condominium ownership. Here are five things to think about before you take the plunge.

You don’t own the land

A condo building is a building or complex consisting of multiple apartments that are individually owned. The entire building is owned by an individual or a property management company, but condo unit owners do not hold the title to the land on which the structure sits. This means the value of the property you own will consist solely of your condo.

Don’t confuse a condominium with a co-op. With a condo, you own a specific part of the building structure, and the use of common areas. With a co-op, or housing cooperative, you own a share of the real estate. As a real estate shareholder, you have the right to live in a certain unit.

On the pro side, living in a condo means you have use of the real estate, but you won’t be spending your weekends mowing the lawn.

On the con side, you can’t change the landscaping and you have to share the common areas with other owners.

Increased amenities, decreased maintenance

Condo communities may offer amenities and common areas (e.g., pools, a garage, or tennis courts) that you may not otherwise be able to afford if purchasing a townhouse or standalone house.

Additionally, condos can relieve you of the need to manage the building maintenance and any amenities. Some interior issues such as plumbing and electricity may be managed by the complex’s community association. You still own your unit, however, so you can decorate and personalize more than you are allowed to as a renter.

If you’re used to fixing things yourself, however, you may not always want to wait for the association to do the job, or get pre-approval before you call a repairman. Also, the association may make a special assessment for large projects, which you may not always agree with.

Built-in social network

Socially, condos can be great owner-occupied properties for singles, couples, and families. Your proximity to your neighbors and access to shared areas mean there will be greater opportunities for you to meet new people.

On the other hand, you’re likely to have less privacy when you’re sharing walls and building access. Neighbors might be able to hear your conversations or see when you come and go.

Before buying, check to see if the other condo owners are friendly and seem likely to be people with whom you would get along. Make sure the building is constructed to minimize noise. If you’ve always lived in a single-family residence, consider renting a condo or apartment before you buy.

Homeowners associations can be bureaucratic

This is obviously a case-by-case situation, but some condo HOAs can be difficult to deal with or have high monthly association fees. Some HOAs can be politicized and hold you accountable for any perceived infringement of rules. Most associations will impose building maintenance fees, whereas in a single-family home you pay for expensive renovations or maintenance projects at a time when you can afford them.

Of course, more single-family homeowners also live with HOAs now, so HOAs are becoming harder to avoid. Ask around about what it’s like to live with an HOA before you join one.

Always take the time to be familiar with the association’s fees before you buy. You could also look at the minutes of the community association’s meetings to see if there are outstanding maintenance issues that are likely to be expensive.

If you are considering purchasing an investment property, be certain that the condo association will allow you to rent out the condo unit on a short-term or long-term basis, before you buy.

Be wary if there are many condos for sale in the building

Unless a condo community is a brand-new construction looking to welcome its first group of condo owners, you might want to think twice about purchasing in a community with many properties for sale. This could mean that there is a high level of dissatisfaction with the building and living conditions.

If more vacancies appear and things spiral downward, the association may fall behind on upkeep, and lose its reserve fund. More buyers avoid the condo complex. Lenders may even refuse to make loans for new purchases, or they may require a larger down payment. Even if all goes well now, you may have a difficult time when you want to sell or refinance.

If you do find your dream home in a community that seems slightly abandoned, try to chat with a resident or two when you tour the condo to see if there are any red flags.

Ultimately, keep these questions in mind: Do you like the condo’s size? Is it in the right neighborhood? Is the building properly maintained and are the amenities to your liking? Can you comfortably afford the mortgage, including homeowners association fees? These considerations will point you in the right direction of a condominium that has everything you want in a home.

Consider me your #1 resource for all things Real Estate! Household changing? Getting married (or divorced)? Time for a change of scenery or job relocation? Want to invest? Just send me an email or call 619-888-2117. I can help.

Motivated Millennials

August 1, 2019

Consider me your #1 resource for all things Real Estate! Household changing? Getting married (or divorced)? Time for a change of scenery or job relocation? Want to invest? Just send me an email or call 619-888-2117. I can help.

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